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"Whoever has become used to feeling like a hermit, whoever sees with a cold gaze through all the social and comradely connections and notices the tiny threads which tie people together, threads so strong that a gust of air breaks them; whoever sees in addition that it is not the flame of genius which makes him a hermit, that flame from whose circle of light all things flee away, because it makes them appear so like a dance of death, so mad, so spindly, and so inane; whoever is, on the contrary, lonely because of a caprice of nature, because of a curiously brewed mixture of wishes, gifts, and endeavors of the will, he knows what an “incomprehensibly lofty marvel” a friend is; and if he is an idolater, he must first and foremost erect an altar to the “unknown god who created the friend”."

— Friedrich Nietzsche 

(Source: silencemadenietzschecry)

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""Know thyself" is the entire field of knowledge. Only when the human being has finally attained knowledge of all things will he have known himself. For things are merely the boundaries of the human being."

— Friedrich Nietzsche 

(Source: silencemadenietzschecry, via johnpeponis25)

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"There are creators in politics, and creative movements, that are poised for a moment in history. Hitler, on the contrary, lacked to a singular degree any Nietzschean element. Hitler is not Zarathoustra. Nor is Trujillo. They represented what Nietzsche calls “the monkey of Zarathoustra.” As Nietzsche said, if one wants to be “a master,” it is not enough to come to power. More often than not it is the “slaves” who come to power, and who keep it, and who remain slaves while they keep it.
The masters according to Nietzsche are the untimely, those who create, who destroy in order to create, not to preserve. Nietzsche says that under the huge earth-shattering events are tiny silent events, which he likens to the creation of new worlds: there once again you see the presence of the poetic under the historical. In France, for instance, there are no earth-shattering events right now. They are far away, and horrible, in Vietnam. But we still have tiny imperceptible events, which maybe announce an exodus from today’s desert. Maybe the return to Nietzsche is one of those “tiny events” and already a reinterpretation of the world."

— Gilles Deleuze, in an interview with Guy Dumur, from Le Nouvel Observateur, April 5, 1967, pp. 40-41.

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"Foucault insists on the importance of the techniques of interpretation. It’s possible that in the actual idea of interpretation is something which goes beyond the dialectical opposition between “knowing” and “transforming” the world. Freud is the great interpreter, so is Nietzsche, but in a different way. Nietzsche’s idea is that things and actions are already interpretations. So to interpret is to interpret interpretations, and thus to change things, “to change life.” What is clear for Nietzsche is that society cannot be an ultimate authority. The ultimate authority is creation, it is art: or rather, art represents the absence and the impossibility of an ultimate authority. From the very beginning of his work, Nietzsche posits that there exist ends “just a little higher” than those of the State, than those of society. He inserts his entire corpus in a dimension which is neither historical, even understood dialectically, nor eternal. What he calls this new dimension which operates both in time and against time is the untimely. It is in this that life as interpretation finds its source. Maybe the reason for the “return to Nietzsche” is a rediscovery of the untimely, that dimension which is distinct both from classical philosophy in its “timeless” enterprise and from dialectical philosophy in its understanding of history: a singular element of upheaval."

— Gilles Deleuze, in an interview with Guy Dumur, from Le Nouvel Observateur, April 5, 1967, pp. 40-41.

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"Indeed, every instance of taking a thing profoundly and fundamentally, is a violation, an intentional injuring of the fundamental will of the spirit, which instinctively aims at appearance and superficiality - in all desire for knowledge there is already a drop of cruelty."

— Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil

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"Whoever is ringed by the flame of jealousy in the end will turn his poisonous stinger upon himself, like the scorpion."

— Friedrich Nietzsche, Thus Spoke Zarathustra

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"My dear friend, what is this our life? A boat that swims in the sea, and all one knows for certain about it is that one day it will capsize. Here we are, two good old boats that have been faithful neighbors, and above all your hand has done its best to keep me from ‘capsizing’! Let us then continue our voyage — each for the other’s sake, for a long time yet, a long time! We should miss each other so much! Tolerably calm seas and good winds and above all sun — what I wish for myself, I wish for you, too, and am sorry that my gratitude can find expression only in such a wish and has no influence at all on wind or weather."

— Nietzsche, in a letter to Franz Overbeck

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"It is said that Nietzsche, after breaking with Lou, entered into a final solitude, walked at night in the mountains that dominate the Gulf of Genoa and lit immense fires there that he watched smolder. I’ve often thought of these fires and their gleam has danced behind my entire intellectual life. So even though I’ve sometimes been unjust toward certain thoughts and certain men whom I’ve met in this century, it is because I’ve unwillingly put them in front of these fires and they were promptly reduced to ashes."

— Albert Camus - Notebooks 1951-1959

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"I want to learn more and more to see as beautiful what is necessary in things; then I shall be one of those who make things beautiful. Amor fati: let that me by love henceforth! I do not want to wage war against what is ugly…"

— Friedrich Nietzsche, The Gay Science, Book IV s.276

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"Remorse — Never yield to remorse, but at once tell yourself: remorse would simply mean adding to the first act of stupidity a second."

Friedrich Nietzsche, The Wanderer and his Shadow, s. 323, R.J. Hollingdale transl.

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"I gave myself up to my thoughts - what else could I do! Of course, this was the very worst thing for my head, but I still do not see how I could have avoided it. This winter my programme will be to recover from myself, to rest myself away from my thoughts - for years I have not had this experience."

— Friedrich Nietzsche

(Source: silencemadenietzschecry)

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"Everyone wants to be the first in this future — and yet death and deathly silence alone are certain and common to all in this future. How strange it is that this sole certainty and common element makes almost no impression on people, and that nothing is further from their minds than the feeling that they form a brotherhood of death. It makes me very happy that men do not want at all to think the thought of death! I should like very much to do something that would make the thought of life a hundred times more appealing to them."

— Friedrich Nietzsche, The Gay Science, Book II

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"No one dies of fatal truths nowadays: there are too many antidotes."

— Friedrich Nietzsche, Human, All Too Human, 1 (1878)

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"Morality as man’s diving himself. A good author, who really cares about his subject, wishes that someone would come and destroy him by representing the same subject more clearly and by answering every last question contained in it… The solider wishes that he might fall on the battlefield for his victorious fatherland, for in the victory of his fatherland his greatest desire is also victorious. The mother gives the child what she takes from herself: sleep, the best food, in some instances even her health, her wealth. Are all these really selfless states, however? Are these acts of morality miracles because they are, to use Schopenhauer’s phrase, ‘impossible and yet real’? Isn’t it clear that, in all these cases, man is loving something of himself, a thought, a longing, an offspring, more than something else of himself that he is thus dividing up his being and sacrificing one part for the other? …In morality, man treats himself not as an ‘individuum,’ but as a ‘dividuum’"

— Friedrich Nietzsche, Human, All Too Human, 1 (1878)

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"Let us impress the image of eternity on our life! This thought contains more than all the religions that have taught us to despise this life as something fleeting and to look towards an indeterminate other life."

— Friedrich Nietzsche, Notes from 1881