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"Have I the right, as an artist still attached to liberty, to accept the advantages in money and consideration that are linked to that attitude? The reply for me would be simple. It is in poverty that I have found and shall always find the conditions essential to keep my culpability, if it exists, from being shameful at least and to keep it proud. But must I reduce my children to poverty, refuse even the very modest comfort I am preparing for them? And in these conditions, was I wrong to accept the simplest human tasks and duties, such as having children? In the end, has one the right to have children, to assume the human condition when one doesn’t believe in God?"

— Albert Camus, Notebooks 1942-1951

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"Death gives its shape to love as it does to life – transforming it into fate. The one you love died while you loved her and now it is a love fixed forever – which, without such an end, would have fallen to pieces. What would the world be without death – a succession of forms evaporating and returning, and anguished flight, and unfinishable world. But fortunately here is death, the stable one."

— Albert Camus - Notebooks 1942-1951

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"No morality but fulfillment. And there is no other fulfillment than that of love, in other words of yielding to oneself and dying to the world. Go all the way. Disappear. Dissolve in love. Then the force of love will create without me. Be swallowed up. Break up. Vanish in fulfillment and the passion of truth."

— Albert Camus - Notebooks 1942-1951

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"I think I don’t care if I’m in a state of contradiction; I don’t want to be a philosophical genius. I don’t even want to be a genius at all, for I have enough trouble just being a man."

— Albert Camus - Notebooks 1942-1951

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"One evening, when we look in the mirror, we see a deeper line around our mouth. What is it? The stuff from which I made the happiness I overcame."

— Albert Camus, Notebooks 1935-1942

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"There is no truth that does not also carry bitterness."

— Albert Camus - “Summer in Algiers,” Nuptials

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I just received my first-ever gift from my dad — the first american edition of The Myth of Sisyphus, which came out in 1955, five years before Camus’s death. This book existed at the same time as Camus. This might be the most thoughtful thing my father has ever done for me.

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"If there is a sin against life, it lies perhaps less in despairing of it than in hoping for another life and evading the implacable grandeur of the one we have."

— Albert Camus - “Summer in Algiers,” Nuptials

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"I want to keep my lucidity to the last, and gaze upon my death with all the fullness of my jealousy and horror. It is to the extent I cut myself off from the world that I fear death the most, to the degree I attach myself to the fate of living men instead of contemplating the unchanging sky. Creating conscious deaths is to diminish the distance that separates us from the world and to accept a consummation without joy, alert to rapturous images of a world forever lost. And the melancholy song of the Djemila hills plunges this bitter lesson deeper into my soul."

— Albert Camus - “The Wind at Djemila,” Nuptials

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"I tell myself: I am going to die, but this means nothing, since I cannot manage to believe it and can only experience other people’s death. I have seen people die. Above all, I have seen dogs die. It was touching them that overwhelmed me. Then I think of flowers, smiles, the desire for women, and realize that my whole horror of death lies in my anxiety to live. I am jealous of those who will live and for whom flowers and the desire for women will have their full flesh and blood meaning. I am envious because I love life too much not to be selfish"

— Albert Camus - “The Wind at Djemila,” Nuptials

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"I have too much youth in me to be able to speak of death. But it seems to me that if I had to speak of it, I would find the right word here between horror and silence to express the conscious certainty of a death without hope"

— Albert Camus - “The Wind at Djemila,” Nuptials

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"Few people realize that there is a refusal that has nothing to do with renunciation. What meaning do words like future, improvement, good job have here? What is meant by the heart’s progress? If I obstinately refuse all the later on’s of this world, it is because I have no desire to give up my present wealth. I do not want to believe that death is the gateway to another life. For me, it is a closed door. I do not say it is a step we all must take, but that it is a horrible and dirty adventure. Everything I am offered seeks to deliver man from the weight of his own life. But as I watch the great birds flying heavily through the sky at Djemila, it is precisely a certain weight of life that I ask for and obtain."

— Albert Camus - “The Wind at Djemila,” Nuptials

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"Yes, I am present. And what strikes me at this moment is that I can go no further – like a man sentenced to life imprisonment, to whom everything is present. But also like a man who know that tomorrow will be the same, and every other day. For when a man becomes conscious of what he is now, it means he expects nothing further."

— Albert Camus, ”The Wind at Djemila,” Nuptials

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"It’s a strange and insufferable certainty to know that monumental beauty always supposes servitude, that, however, servitude is beauty and one cannot help but desire beauty and one cannot desire servitude; servitude remains no less intolerable. Perhaps it’s for this that I put the beauty of a landscape above all else — it’s not paid for by any injustice and my heart is free there."

— Albert Camus - Notebooks 1951-1959

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"The opposite of reaction is not revolution, but creation. The world is in an unending state of reaction and thus unendingly in danger of revolution. What defines progress, if it is such, is that without compromise, creators of all kinds triumph over the mind, over reaction, and over inactivity without revolution being necessary. When there are no more of these creators, revolution is inevitable."

— Albert Camus - Notebook 1951-1959